Photos of Dukha or reindeer herders in Taiga, North Mongolia

1456647_789417941084694_1724694501_nTulga, Nomadic Trails Tour Leader

From the soul of steppe nomads, Tulga grew up in the Gobi area where giant sand dunes, camels and the most hospitable people in the world live! Tulga likes to cheer up his “Wind Horse” (spiritual mind) by riding tough Mongolian horses through the open steppe rather than going to the monastery to pray. Tulga spends a lot of time in the Taiga area of the Siberian Mountains, where he loves to spend time with the reindeer herders learning more about their unique culture.

In his career he has summited Mount Khuiten (4374m), trekked across Potanin glacier, one of the biggest in Mongolia, and cross country dog sledded in –40°C. He is a first rate tour leader and we are proud to call him ‘our man in Mongolia’.

He has been visiting Taiga, North Mongolia for many years and here is his some of photographs;

Picture 1. Autumn Reindeer.

Reindeer needed good and safe pasture are to feed themselves so well for preparing harsh and snowy winter. Reindeer are about 1.20 – 2.20 meters long and about 0.90 – 1.40 meters high. They weigh between 60 – 300 kilograms. Usually live to be 12–15 years old, sometimes they can live to be 20 years old.

Reindeer in autum camp

Reindeer in autum camp

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 2.  Family Tee-pee

There are 24-26 families with the population of 400 people living near Russia Mongolian border. The Border was closed in late 1950’s and those ones who were traveling back forth couldn’t travel to each side and a few people left in Mongolian side. Those people spread east and west bank of River Shishged, now being called  East and West Taiga.

 

renchinlhumbe-mountain

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 3. Little Reindeer herder

The average reindeer family has 3-4 children. Not the fastest growing tribes in Mongolia yet.

little-reindeer-herder

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 4. Proud little reindeer herder

Children in Taiga, start gaming in their early age by tracking animal foot prints and facing some of predators!

 

children-in-taiga-north-mongolia-start-to-do-gaming-in-their-early-age-by-tracking-animal-foot-prints-and-facing-some-of-the-predators-its-all-their-lifetime-experience

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 5. Riding reindeer

Reindeer is only means of transport in a the forest in winter.

riding-reindeer-taiga

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 6. Reindeer Selfie

reindeer-selfie

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 7. Moving with reindeer.

Young men in a group of 3-4, take their reindeer from all families, searching for better and safer pasture land. It takes them 3-4 days to travel. Once they found their suitable pasture land, they settle for 2 weeks untill their replacement arrive. For young men, it is one the challanging activities to survive.

on-the-move

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 8. Reindeer in the morning

Reindeer finds food for themselves easily from under the snow.

reindeer-taiga

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 9. On the move

rein-deer-in-the-pasture-land

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 10. Morning

In January, temperature drops -40C and both human and animals need to survive.

morining

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Picture 11. Travelling to Reindeer herders /Dukha people with reindeer

Visiting reindeer people in winter is still possible when you have proper equipment and right tour guide.

reindeer-herders-visit

♥ Book tour to reindeer herders

Hope you enjoyed with this post and see you in the next post.

Thank you

3 Comments

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